National Theatre

2021. október 1. 12:30
When the old building of the National Theatre on Blaha Lujza Square was blown up on 15 March 1965, no one would have thought the institution would operate in a temporary location for three and a half decades. The National Theatre held its opening performance on 1 October 1966, in the building of the former Hungarian Theatre on Hevesi Sándor Square, and until 2000, it was the home of the company.
2021. július 30. 09:00
It is always exciting to follow the change, especially when it comes to Budapest. Old photos faithfully document what a house, street or square in the capital used to be like. With their help we can recall the former Haas Palace in Gizella Square, marvel at how - in the 1880s and 1890s - barren the Rózsadomb was, and today's Margit Boulevard were more like the streets of a small town. Factories stood on the banks of the Danube in Pest, next to the Parliament building under construction.
2021. február 12. 19:00
The outstanding Hungarian actress, Kossuth prize-winner Gizi Bajor died seventy years ago. Her name is known by everyone that is even slightly interested in Hungarian theatre. What is less known is that her villa was a safe haven in 1944 and 1945, where she sheltered, among others, Jews and famous writers in hiding. Since her death, the villa on Stromfeld Aurél Road in the 12th District has preserved her memory as the Gizi Bajor Museum.
2020. november 17. 09:00
Budapest is a city of constant change. This is especially true for parts of the city that were once industrial centres or served these industries. The decaying remains of 100–150-year-old factories are often called rust belts. While the future of many of these areas remains uncertain, some examples have been completely transformed and given an entirely new lease on life. Over the past 25 years, the Millennium City Centre has sprouted where the Danube-Bank Freight Station once stood and has become such an area.
2020. október 28. 09:00
Lajta Béla was one of the most influential Hungarian architects of the first decades of the 20th century. Starting in the footsteps of Ödön Lechner, his art nouveau style grew into a new form and became a forerunner of Hungarian modern architecture. He represented a new approach to the formation of mass while retaining folk-based decorations and the ornamentation of art nouveau, and he connected it to new materials and designed buildings which were monumental in their simplicity. Buildings that have remained beautiful examples of modern urban architecture to the present day.
2020. október 14. 10:00
An independent theatre for folk plays that is the Popular Theatre or People's Theatre, Népszínház was opened as a home for the genre which had become popular during the Hungarian National Awakening. The building was completed as a result of an increasingly concerted effort and support from the city. Standing on the present-day Blaha Lujza Square, the structure was designed by the Austrian architects Fellner and Helmer, who were well-known for their theatres. The beautiful building in the eclectic-style was opened with much circumstance on 15 October 1875. The building housed the National Theatre from 1908 and was torn down in the spring of 1965.