National Theatre

2023. január 28. 09:00
The young Imre Madách lived in Pest for three years. While completing his law studies at the University of Pest, he also got involved in social and cultural life. He regularly visited the performances of the Hungarian Theatre of Pest, attended concerts at the National Casino, but the highly educated young man also learned to paint, fence, and play the piano in the capital. His first volume was published here. Pestbuda remembers Imre Madách, who was born 200 years ago.
2023. január 23. 10:00
Béla Lajta was one of the most brilliant figures in the history of Hungarian architecture, who fortunately was properly appreciated even in his own time, and posterity cherishes his memory with respect. A long series of studies and several books have already been published about his life and work, and three years ago Pestbuda also commemorated the 100th anniversary of his death. Today Hungarians celebrate the anniversary of his birth as he was born 150 years ago. On this occasion, Pestbuda now presents a topic close to his heart, his designs for the former National Theatre.
2022. november 9. 13:30
The planting of trees has begun in Blaha Lujza Square, which is under renovation: a total of eighty new trees are being planted in the boxes previously created for them. In their surroundings, a skeletal soil was built to help the roots grow. It will remind people of the National Theatre, which was demolished and blown up in 1965, that the outline of the building will appear in the paving, and burgundy-coloured public furniture referring to the theatre's former chairs will be placed in the square. The renovation will be completed this year.
2022. október 19. 12:30
He was one of the most important figures in the history of Budapest, who devoted all his energy to the development of the capital. Baron Frigyes Podmaniczky managed the Public Works Council for more than thirty years, essentially everything that we now consider Budapest's architectural and cultural heritage was built during his time. He played a decisive role not only in the development of the city but also in the theatre world. Perhaps the most popular person in Budapest, who worked for the city until his death, died 115 years ago.
2022. június 15. 11:00
The first National Theatre, built in 1837, stood on today's Astoria, on the corner of Rákóczi Road - Múzeum Boulevard. The facade of the classicist building was completely rebuilt in 1875, and a huge residential house was built next to it. A few years later, the audience in Pest could witnessed something that was given to a few at the time: the introduction of electric lighting. With this, the National became the third theatre in the world, whose stage, auditorium and facade were illuminated in this way.
2022. május 2. 11:00
The Austro-Hungarian Compromise, established in 1867, ushered in one of Hungary's heyday. Under the Compromise of 155 years ago, a dual system was created - hence our common word dualism, which is used to characterise the period up to 1918. This upswing has brought about great changes: as a result of industrialisation, more and more people have moved to the cities, and the population of Budapest has grown exponentially. But what was the capital like in the second half of the 1860s?
2022. március 12. 14:00
Restoration work began in the building of the Hungarian State Opera in October 2017. The renovation, which lasted for almost 5 years, not only serves to further illuminate one of the architectural gems of Budapest, but it also represents the basic requirements of the 21th century. The history of the construction of the Opera House also proves that these requirements have changed from time to time.
2022. március 2. 09:00
Born 205 years ago, János Arany first saw Pest in 1843, but he only became a permanent resident of the city more than a decade and a half later, in 1860 - and remained so until his death. Several of the poet's former homes in Pest still stand today: the two classicist houses on Üllői Road preserve the memory of the poet, as well as the magnificent palace of the Academy, in which he lived for the rest of his life.
2021. október 1. 12:30
When the old building of the National Theatre on Blaha Lujza Square was blown up on 15 March 1965, no one would have thought the institution would operate in a temporary location for three and a half decades. The National Theatre held its opening performance on 1 October 1966, in the building of the former Hungarian Theatre on Hevesi Sándor Square, and until 2000, it was the home of the company.
2021. július 30. 09:00
It is always exciting to follow the change, especially when it comes to Budapest. Old photos faithfully document what a house, street or square in the capital used to be like. With their help we can recall the former Haas Palace in Gizella Square, marvel at how - in the 1880s and 1890s - barren the Rózsadomb was, and today's Margit Boulevard were more like the streets of a small town. Factories stood on the banks of the Danube in Pest, next to the Parliament building under construction.
2021. február 12. 19:00
The outstanding Hungarian actress, Kossuth prize-winner Gizi Bajor died seventy years ago. Her name is known by everyone that is even slightly interested in Hungarian theatre. What is less known is that her villa was a safe haven in 1944 and 1945, where she sheltered, among others, Jews and famous writers in hiding. Since her death, the villa on Stromfeld Aurél Road in the 12th District has preserved her memory as the Gizi Bajor Museum.
2020. november 17. 09:00
Budapest is a city of constant change. This is especially true for parts of the city that were once industrial centres or served these industries. The decaying remains of 100–150-year-old factories are often called rust belts. While the future of many of these areas remains uncertain, some examples have been completely transformed and given an entirely new lease on life. Over the past 25 years, the Millennium City Centre has sprouted where the Danube-Bank Freight Station once stood and has become such an area.
2020. október 28. 09:00
Lajta Béla was one of the most influential Hungarian architects of the first decades of the 20th century. Starting in the footsteps of Ödön Lechner, his art nouveau style grew into a new form and became a forerunner of Hungarian modern architecture. He represented a new approach to the formation of mass while retaining folk-based decorations and the ornamentation of art nouveau, and he connected it to new materials and designed buildings which were monumental in their simplicity. Buildings that have remained beautiful examples of modern urban architecture to the present day.
2020. október 14. 10:00
An independent theatre for folk plays that is the Popular Theatre or People's Theatre, Népszínház was opened as a home for the genre which had become popular during the Hungarian National Awakening. The building was completed as a result of an increasingly concerted effort and support from the city. Standing on the present-day Blaha Lujza Square, the structure was designed by the Austrian architects Fellner and Helmer, who were well-known for their theatres. The beautiful building in the eclectic-style was opened with much circumstance on 15 October 1875. The building housed the National Theatre from 1908 and was torn down in the spring of 1965.