Ede Telcs is an outstanding figure in Hungarian sculpture, and his works in Budapest include representative public monument, tombstone and architectural sculpture. His works adorning the Hungarian capital were mostly placed in City Park and the National Graveyard on Fiumei Road, as well as in the city centre. His work is intertwined with the life of the famous personalities, mainly with the architect Ignác Alpár, of Budapest which was developing into a world city.

The palace of Liszt Academy in Liszt Ferenc Square was handed over on 12 May 1907, just 115 years ago. One of the most important buildings in the field of music was designed by the excellent architects Kálmán Giergl and Flóris Korb, but the outstanding craftsmen of the age also took part in the works. The architects worked on the plans for years to erect a modern building decorated with Hungarian elements according to the customer's request.

We can count on the help of paramedics in Budapest for 135 years now. The Budapest Volunteer Ambulance Association started its operation on 10 May 1887 in today's Szent István Square, but soon after, they were able to move into their new headquarters on Markó Street. The paramedics initially rode in horse-drawn carriages, but in 1902, 120 years ago, they already rushed in an electric car to help those in trouble.

Finding and viewing pieces of the architectural heritage of a city with a long history is an eternal tourist hit. Budapest stands out in this area mostly with the legacy of dualism and the two world wars: almost everyone have encountered the names of Miklós Ybl, Imre Steindl or Ödön Lechner, but if we dig deeper, it is impossible to list how many undeservedly lesser-known talents contributed to the decoration of the Hungarian capital. The building of the Buda Postal Palace, which adorns the south-western side of Széll Kálmán Square, is also connected to such a genius: a remarkable volume came out this year about Gyula Sándy's life and work, both from a professional and a layman's point of view.

Another sculpture with a long history was renewed in the capital: the Immaculata statue in Krisztinaváros, erected 320 years ago in 1702 - the oldest public sculpture in Budapest - has been replaced by a copy since 1928, and in the meantime this work has also needed to be restored. The work was carried out at the Department of Restoration of the Hungarian University of Fine Arts recently, and yesterday the sculpture was placed at the Krisztina Square erection site.

The statue of Ferenc Rákóczi II has been standing on Kossuth Square for 85 years now. Its erection was decided on the 200th anniversary of his death, and two years later, in 1937, the statue stood. Since then, only the inscriptions have been changed, sometimes for political or grammatical reasons.

Today, we take it for granted to buy a plane ticket and simply get on the plane. Few think about since when we can do this. And now we are celebrating an anniversary: our predecessors were first able to board a passenger plane in Budapest 100 years ago. Since then, the industry and tourism have also undergone tremendous development: almost 16 million passengers turned up at Liszt Ferenc Airport in the year before the epidemic.

The Austro-Hungarian Compromise, established in 1867, ushered in one of Hungary's heyday. Under the Compromise of 155 years ago, a dual system was created - hence our common word dualism, which is used to characterise the period up to 1918. This upswing has brought about great changes: as a result of industrialisation, more and more people have moved to the cities, and the population of Budapest has grown exponentially. But what was the capital like in the second half of the 1860s?

The hot air balloon lookout opened in Városliget is not the first such contraption in Budapest: it was already possible to rise above the city with a balloon at the millennium exhibition. However, the balloon, Turul, launched 120 years ago on 1 May 1902, was not intended to entertain the public, but to do research. In addition to meteorological observations,we can also thank it for a number of aerial photographs, which show how Budapest looked from above at the beginning of the 20th century.

Television is nearly a hundred-year-old invention that many Hungarian researchers worked on in the beginning. In Hungary, however, work began only in the 1950s to enable Hungarian broadcasting in Hungarian households. The experimental broadcasts started in 1956, and after the revolution, on the evening of 26 April 1957, a film was shown on television, but the first "official" broadcast, the Heroes' Square parade, was broadcast by the Hungarian Television only on 1 May 1957, for political reasons.

In the vicinity of Szabadság Square, the Postatakarékpénztár [Postal Savings Bank], which was built at the turn of the century, has been being renovated for months. In addition to Ödön Lechner's main work, three other works by the master are also being restored: the Museum of Applied Arts, the Balás Sipeki Villa next to the Városliget and the Drechsler Palace on Andrássy Avenue. While the latter are undergoing a larger-scale change visible from the outside, in the case of the Postal Savings Bank, its internal box office will get back its original dome. Once upon a time, this was also characterized by an imaginative ornamentation similar to the façade, but it was remodelled over time according to the needs of its use, but it was not spared by the storms of history.

One of the most charming open-air venues in the city centre is the Museum Garden, which once again shines in its full splendour: looking at its sculptures and memorial plaques, or relaxing on one of the museum’s steps and benches, can reminds us of the rich past of this special historical site. This extraordinary richness is illustrated by a gap-filling publication, the Museum Garden Guide, which - worthy of its title - guides us through the garden, recalling the events of the past, with many surprises in store for the reader.

One of the newest buildings of the Buda Castle connects the Hunyadi courtyard with the Csikós courtyard, starting next to the Royal Guard. Walking along the Hauszmann ramp that is the same as the original, we can not only admire the panorama of Krisztinaváros, but also discover exciting details: the walls of the building preserve the memories of several eras.

Budapest's traffic was at a crossroads 60 years ago as well as now. Experts sought answers to questions about how much the then outdated public transport network needs to be developed and how to prepare the city for the expected car traffic. Studies have also helped to make these decisions. Based on a work published 60 years ago, we present the transport dilemmas of Budapest at that time.

To this day, Törley champagne is one of the most famous Hungarian products, an almost obligatory element of the celebrations in Hungary, and the brand is also present in many foreign countries. Like almost everything, the roots of this factory date back to the second half of the 19th century, the period of dualism: József Törley founded his plant in Budafok in 1882, exactly one hundred and forty years ago. However, not only the drink made there is of a very high standard, but also the family's buildings in Budapest.

One of the first machine factories in Pest practically operated as a subsidiary of the József Rolling Mill, and for economic reasons it became an independent factory, which then became one of the first machine factories in Hungarian industry 175 years ago. Unfortunately, it was not long-lived, but its impact was significant.

Before the turn of the century, the Calvary on Golgota Square in Józsefváros was built, demolished in 1971, and the chapel was blown up. In recent years, the stations of Calvary, which were handed over on Friday, have been restored.

An exhibition can be seen in Gül Baba's tomb, which commemorates one of the largest enterprises of the 19th century, the opening of the Danube to the east. Among the objects we can see the model of the boat, Julietta, the original of which was used by István Széchenyi and his companions when they crossed the Danube in 1830 on a houseboat, Desdemona, which was built for this purpose, assessing the difficulties before sailing.

Lipót Strelisky was one of the first to deal with daguerreotypes in Budapest in the 1840s. In his studio in Dorottya Street, he photographed the politicians, aristocrats and artists of the age. His son, Sándor Strelisky, who died a hundred years ago, was the first photographer in Hungary to take multi-character photographs with a special technique. Strelisky photos are invaluable today and help us learn about Budapest's past.

As in the current drought, Hungary and Budapest was hit by a significant water shortage fifty years ago, exacerbated by an outdated water supply network and regular pipe ruptures. The situation was so critical in 1971–1972 that the water consumption of industrial plants was restricted and the population felt water shortages, as in many places there was no water flowing from the taps, so for a while the water supply had to be secured by water carts.

Although the construction of bridges has a long tradition in Budapest, in the XIX. century there was not enough expertise and technology at home for this job for a long time. Foreign engineers also originally built the Chain Bridge, the Margit Bridge and the Railway Bridge. The first completely Hungarian Danube crossing was the Ferenc József Bridge, which was built in 1896 for the celebration of the millennium of Hungary.

The best-known building of Széll Kálmán Square is the former Buda Postal Palace, which has been dignified over the area since its handover in 1926. Hungarian Post (Magyar Posta) moved out of it in 2008, so it was empty for many years, it only found a customer in 2016. It was transferred to the Hungarian National Bank in 2018, and thanks to the reconstruction that began at that time, the building was reborn as the HNB Supervisory Centre and Money Museum. Huge changes have taken place, but they have been carried out with careful attention, and the interiors have been renewed in a way that also reflects the original states. PestBuda toured the renovated building.

On the plot of the corner building at 32 Váci Street - 2 Kígyó Street after the Turkish occupation the first public pharmacy in Pest, the Szentháromság [Holy Trinity] pharmacy operated. Its builder and owner was the pharmacist, Heinrich Siegfried Herold. The plot is well-located and has housed a number of shops and high-ranked tenants in recent centuries since the pharmacy moved out: the fabric store addressed to the Green tree [a Zöld fához in Hungarian], the sign of which was painted by Miklós Barabás, and a bookshop of the famous bookseller family, the Kiliáns where also housed here. The building, which is still in a very dilapidated condition, is under the district's unique protection and is a prominent archaeological site.

The József Attila housing estate is one of the districts of Budapest with the most green areas, trees and bushes, in 2012 it even won the title of the most flowering housing estate in the country. However, fewer and fewer people here know that there was a time when this area was not known for its comfort. Its name was also different, which in itself revealed a lot about the conditions here: Marie Valerie emergency housing estate.

The oldest, still operating university in Hungary, the legal predecessor of today's Eötvös Loránd University, Semmelweis University and Pázmány Péter Catholic University, began operating in Nagyszombat [today Trnava] in 1635. Maria Theresa decided to move it, and although it was suggested that it should be placed in the Invalidus Palace in Pest, in the building of today's Central Town Hall, it was finally moved to Buda, into the Castle, in 1777.

At the beginning of March 1848, the National Museum was one of the most important places in the life of the youth of March, including Sándor Petőfi. Half a decade earlier, Petőfi's life was also connected to this area at several points, as the main locations of his stay in Pest in 1843 and 1844 can be found in the area around the museum. There were several buildings in the area that no longer exist today, where the poet visited for a short time or was just renting accommodation.

The only authentic copper cannon connected to Áron Gábor, which is known from the famous folk song, can be seen in a worthy place, in the building of the reborn Guard House at the Buda Castle. At the exhibition on the War of Independence of 1848-49, visitors can admire the cannon itself, but there are many other interesting objects associated with the revolution and the period of retaliation shown in the building.

Restoration work began in the building of the Hungarian State Opera in October 2017. The renovation, which lasted for almost 5 years, not only serves to further illuminate one of the architectural gems of Budapest, but it also represents the basic requirements of the 21th century. The history of the construction of the Opera House also proves that these requirements have changed from time to time.

One of the most famous buildings of Széll Kálmán Square, the former Buda Postal Palace, has undergone huge changes in recent years. It was purchased by the Hungarian National Bank and began its renovation in 2018. Its exterior has been restored to its golden age, while its interiors have been modernised to accommodate its new functions: most of it has been occupied by the bank's supervisory centre, and the Money Museum was installed in the north wing, which will open on 15 March. However, it was already shown to the press, where Pestbuda could also report from.

Two coats of arms were placed on the Chain Bridge 170 years ago, three years after it opened. Family, noble symbols that referred to the two people without whom the first permanent Danube bridge connecting Pest and Buda would not have been built. They were the greatest Hungarian and a wealthy banker, István Széchenyi and György Sina, to whom the general meeting of the Chain Bridge Company wanted to give gratitude this way.

A new four-storey wing will be added to the Városmajor Cardiology and Vascular Clinic on the site below 70 Városmajor Street, where the Diagnostic Center will be located. The new and old blocks of the clinic are planned to be connected by a bridge.

The experts of the Várkapitányság discovered another valuable find during the research carried out in the Buda Castle, as they found a marble fireplace in the dining room between the royal and princely suites, in addition to the ornamental fireplaces of the former Andrássy and Deák foyers in the Krisztinaváros wing. The finds will make a significant contribution to the most authentic reconstruction possible, as the fireplaces have always been in keeping with the room, so they can provide an important point of reference.

The Károlyi Sándor Hospital in Újpest will be expanded with a new part of the building. In addition to the construction of the new seven-storey wing, the main building of the hospital, designed by Miklós Ybl, will also be renovated, but a building deemed dangerous will also be demolished in the area.

On the border of Budakalász and the Barát stream, in addition to several prehistoric finds, the remains of a medieval cellar have also been found. The cellar may have belonged to the medieval village of Kissing, and probably dates back to the 13th century.

The third structure of the new connecting railway bridge is now passable, as its last piece has been replaced. The rail and other works will then be carried out and the trial load is expected to take place in early August. This marked another milestone in the development of the Southern Circuit, which aims to increase the utilization of suburban trains, thereby reducing car traffic in the capital.

The image of Budapest includes the old trams. From Saturday there will be nostalgic trams again, the vehicles will run between the city center and Óbuda.

Instead of the 29 trees previously felled, 36 new ones were planted in the 6th district Benczúr street, and the size of the wood places was also increased. The 36 new trees were planted by experts from Főkert.

A 13th district real estate and a 21st district complex was declared a monument, thus further expanding the list of monuments in the capital. In addition to a number of rural properties published in the Hungarian Gazette last Friday, the service buildings of the residential building at 20 Kartács Street and the Kvassay Lock adjacent to the Kvassay Bridge received monument protection.

Two more of Molnár-C. Paul's two more paintings were placed in the Budapest-Downtown Parish Church on Thursday. Earlier, he also made the crucifix hanging above the sanctuary and the main altarpiece, as they were destroyed in World War II.

Next year, the renovation of the area on the Károly boulevard side of the Central Town Hall, which was used as a car park, may begin. The results of last year’s design competition were announced today, with the winning plan to preserve the existing trees in an area of about 8,000 square meters, next to which new ones will be planted, a number of new benches will be erected and there will also be bumps. The renovation of Town Hall Park is expected to be completed by 2024.

On Thursday, in the park area in front of the Church of the Heart of Jesus in Városmajor, a memorial to the civilian and military victims of world war II was handed over. The monument, which consists of two granite blocks, depicts in an abstract way the loss that extinguished human lives have meant and will mean to those affected.

Among the prehistoric traces, the staff of the Budapest History Museum presumably found medieval burials next to Budafoki street in Újbuda. Traces of Stone Age finds and buildings have been found in the area before, now the former cemetery of the village of Kocsola, which was destroyed in the Middle Ages, has probably been found.

Renovation of Bosnyák Square, intended as the main square of the 14th district, may begin soon. It is planned that not only a new town hall, specialist clinic and fair hall will be built, but also a completely new quarter, and the affected section of the Rákos stream will be rehabilitated. The investment, previously declared a priority, has now received a building permit.

On Thursday, the Törőcsik Mari park was inaugurated in the 11th district. The hitherto unnamed parkland at Bottomless Lake now bears the name of the legendary actress.

The imposing roof of the Art Nouveau apartment building at 3 / A Károly boulevard will be rebuilt soon. The roof of the house, built after the turn of the century, was damaged in World War II and was later restored in a simplified manner. The roof reconstruction of the building, which is now home to the Downtown Theater, was made a priority investment by a government decree issued last week.

The number of bus waiters planted and planted with plants in the city center has further expanded. The green waiting places have been handed over in Hild Square, Servita Square, Podmaniczky Square and Jászai Mari Square, so there are now eight green bus waiting areas in the city center.

The Lipótmező mental hospital was once considered one of the best psychiatric institutes in the country. The institution, officially called the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology, was closed in 2007. It was decided two years ago that an educational institution would be built in the huge building complex. The associated remodeling and refurbishment work will begin soon as the development was declared a priority investment by the government on Tuesday.

A running circle has been set up around downtown Olympic Park. The new running circle awaits those wishing to run with a solar-powered speed indicator board with LED display, stretch railings, a safe and a drinking fountain.

The exterior facade of the Kútvölgyi Hospital was renewed, the doors and windows of the tower building were replaced, and the cooling and heating system was also modernized. At the same time, internal renovation work is already underway.

96 sick, life-threatening poplar trees are cut down along Pók Street in Óbuda, which are replaced by native trees with large stature and large canopy. Work will now take place in April and autumn.

After decades of oblivion, the former Downtown Café will open under the name Matild Café & Cabaret on 19 May at the South Klotild Palace. The two-storey, 300-seat café has been restored based on contemporary drawings and photographs.

The air gate of Budapest is Liszt Ferenc International Airport. In common parlance, the history of the airport, also called Ferihegy Airport after its old name, is very adventurous, as it was planned before the war, but only handed over afterwards. There have been several significant changes in the life of the airport since then, such as the construction of Terminal 2B, which had just begun 25 years ago.

The Károli Gáspár Reformed University is moving into the former BÁV headquarters in Ferencváros. According to the idea, the Faculty of Law and Political Science of the University, the Institute of Psychology and the Rector's Office would serve as the new home of the 11th district historic building. The goal is to develop the university and create a modern educational environment.

From the beginning of May, we will be able to admire the capital from a hot air balloon rising to a height of more than 100 meters, as the Ballon Lookout will be put into operation on Mimóza Hill in the Városliget, which will be a rarity not only in Hungary but also in Central Europe. The balloon revives an old tradition, as a similar device was already operating in the Grove during the 1896 millennium celebrations.

Margaret Boulevard can be significantly greened: in addition to nearly 5,000 perennial and bulbous plants, at least a dozen new trees will be planted on the side of the road. In addition, a tender is planned to clean the facades of the stone-paved houses on Margaret Boulevard.

The new center of the Artist Training Institute has received the building permit. The building will be realized as part of the National Circus Arts Center, planned for part of the rust zone next to the Western Railway Station, by rebuilding and expanding a former diesel locomotive repair hall.

In the modernist villa of the district, Walter Rózsi and his family lived first, and then it became the kindergarten and pediatrician's office of the BM Hospital. It was Designed by József Fischer. The newly renovated building has opened as a new exhibition space of the Hungarian Museum of Architecture and the Monument Protection Documentation Center.

The more than two-hundred-year-old Chapel of the Holy Blood in Kiscell has been renovated. Among other things, the building received a new roof structure, a tower and modern lighting, and the chapel was enriched with a new altarpiece and statues, the gate of which can be seen through the newly opened openings even if it is closed.

Special finds were found during the wall research and basic excavation of the Buda Castle Palace. The fragments, walls and tiles that have just been unearthed are significant because they can help determine exactly what the palace, which was enlarged at the turn of the last century, was based on the plans of Alajos Hauszmann, looked like.

Next to the city wall of Pest, built during the reign of King Matthias, the new community space of the city center, the Bastion Park, was established. If you visit here, you will find a lookout point to the Rock Chapel on Gellért Hill, a playground and a city history gallery. The space made greener with new trees and plants was taken over by the general public yesterday.