A settlement needs water. And Buda Castle had various water supplies even in the middle ages. The city was supplied with water from the springs of Svábhegy and the Danube. Until the middle of the 19th century, pumps powered by animals pushed the water to the top of the hill. The first engine-powered pumping station in Buda was established 165 years ago, opening in 1856. Its designer was Adam Clark, the engineer that led the construction of Chain Bridge.

Recent earthquakes in Croatia have caused more than 100 million HUF damage in Hungary, while some tremors have even been felt in Budapest. Earthquakes are not extremely common in the Carpathian Basin but do occur sporadically. One of the largest recorded tremors in Hungary, which also led to the loss of life, happened on the outskirts of Budapest 65 years ago, in January 1956.

The department store is one of Kálvin Square's defining buildings and stands on a plot that once housed a school operated by the Reformed Church. In the interwar years, the city knew the shop as the Fenyvess Department Store. And while it only bore the name for 25 years, many remember the name to this day.

Two hundred years ago, a younger Hungarian hussar officer made a rather reckless statement to a friend. His words had many consequences and changed the lives of many forever. The officer, in fact, was only in a hurry to reach his father's funeral.

The building has housed one of the most beautiful cafes in Budapest, a casino, a pharmacy, a glove shop and a car dealership. Until recently, the building that once housed Café Palermo was a black sheep on Andrássy Avenue, but the era of real-estate related corruption and degradation has come to an end. Standing on the corner of Liszt Ferenc Square and Andrássy Avenue, the building currently hidden by a safety net, which hides the luxury apartments being built as part of the restoration.

Even when building Chainbridge the builders knew, the Buda bridgehead is in the wrong place, a point which is difficult to reach with a cart or carriage. A solution was needed, but Castle Hill stood in the way. Eventually, a company was founded to break through the hill 175 years ago.

Leopold Rottenbiller is one of the most unjustly forgotten politicians of Budapest's history, even though a major road bears the name of the urban leader to this day. He served as the Lord Mayor of Pest for three terms, and not in periods of growth, construction and peace. Despite this, Rottenbiller kept the city working. His second term began 160 years ago.

The National Hauszmann Program recently announced that the destroyed tower of the National Archives' building in Buda Castle would be rebuilt during the building's renovation. Join Pestbuda on a stroll through the history of this iconic tower.

The Óbuda Synagogue is one of the most important historical monuments of the 3rd District and is extremely valuable within Budapest as a whole as well. Nevertheless, it is less well known than its stunning counterparts in Pest, the Dohány Street and Kazinczy Street Synagogues, despite being an immense example of not only synagogue architecture, but also of Hungarian classicist architecture.

Various plans to redesign the inner sections of Józsefváros and replace the out-dated kitchen and room flats built at the end of the 19th century were floated decades ago. Fifty years ago the Budapest Council adopted a large-scale plan to demolish 3,400 flats. By the time the district already had mixed experiences of how the city centre could be rehabilitated.

A few years ago, the temporary removal of the Attila József statue – erected in 1980 on the site of the former Andrássy monument – from Kossuth Square due to the area's renovation caused an enormous uproar. Many believed that the work had been removed permanently. But a few months later, the statue was on Kossuth Square again. Although it was not put back in its original place, many say it found a better place only a few metres away, on the riverbank.

Forty-five years ago, in the last days of 1975, a new urban planning regulation was adopted in Budapest. The purpose of the provision was to provide an appropriate framework for the construction or housing estates and urban development, while also designating development zones and the number of buildings to be erected.

One hundred and twenty years ago its massive dome was the pride of Dísz Square. However, for the last 70 years, the military headquarters' partially deconstructed remains have lacked form and function. However, this is set to change. After a partial renovation between 2012 and 2014, its continued reconstruction will begin next year, restoring the building to its former glory, and serving visitors to Buda's Castle District.

What did festive preparations look like in the Belle Époque and the decades following the first world war? Join PestBuda on a glance through Christmases of the past based on old newspaper articles and photos from Budapest's olden days.

Among the noble families of Hungary, the Széchenyi's particularly contributed to the growth of Budapest. Works associated with István Széchenyi, the Chain Bridge and the building of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences are emblematic sites of the city, and his father, Ferenc Széchényi, can be tied to important institutions such as the National Széchényi Library and the Hungarian National Museum. The two respected institutions, which were one at the time, were founded in 1802 by Count Ferenc Széchényi as the third national collection in Europe. Today is the 200th anniversary of his death.

1850 was a dark year for Hungary. After the war of independence was lost, so was freedom. Haynau's reign of terror through thousands into prison. But in 1850 a dream came true. A rail connection was completed between Pest and Vienna reached.

One of the most versatile architects of the interwar years in Hungary Aladrás Münnich designed villas, residential buildings, bank buildings, are large-scale urban planning projects. He was also a popular expert writer. But he is best known for his massive industrial project, both at home and abroad.

In a recent interview the Minister of Finance stated that after renovation, the former building of the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology (OPNI) would house an institution providing higher education in diplomatic and economic training fields. Thus, contrary to earlier reports that the government does not plan to establish a boarding school in the 39,000 -square-metre building complex, which stands in a 41-hectare park.

A petition for the protection of Kiserdő, along Határ Road, was recently taken to the Mayor of Budapest by local NGOs. The petition protests the planned access road leading to Galvani Bridge on the Pest bank of the river.

Elegant and spectacular villa buildings line Andrássy Avenue, one of them is the Bulyovszky Villa. The villa was built as a summer house for the famed actress Bulyovszky née Lilla Szilágyi and designed by the young Sándor Fellner. Standing on the corner of Rippl-Rónai Street, the building recently reemerged into the spotlight. The 55% share of the property'S ownership rights, held by the Hungarian Women's Association was put up for auction. The process was suspended in early December, and the Hungarian Women's Association sold its share. The ill-fated villa has thus entered new ownership. Making this the best moment to dive into its past.

Plans to create a five-year, international boarding secondary school in the building that once housed the National National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology in the 2nd District have been slated. The building will remain state-owned. The building on Hűvösvölgyi út was built as a mental asylum in 1868 and was closed in 2007. It has been empty since.

The Fehérvári Roundel and its surroundings are to be demolished and rebuilt to its original size in Buda Castle. One of the main goals of the National Hauszmann Program is to allow visitors to Buda Castle to explore the Castle District by walking around it on its walls. The Fehérvári Roundel plays a major role in enabling this. Following the reconstruction, a previously closed section of the western castle wall will be opened, connecting the roundel to Csikós Courtyard. The western gardens will be revitalised to evoke the vineyards and orchards that once surrounded Budavár. Várgarázs III. will meanwhile further reduce the number of cars parked in the Castle.

A small plaza can be found at the junction of Ferenc Boulevard and Üllői Road. It was named in 1996. It is known as Angyal István Park. There is no inscription to indicate this despite a statue of a paper aeroplane being erected in 2014, and most passers-by do not know that the city honoured one of the heroes of the 1956 revolution, the leader of the Tűzoltó Street insurgents, with the square 24 years ago. And perhaps even fewer know that before 1956 the square did not even exist, but was covered by three residential buildings standing side by side.

One of the most beautiful and largest fountains in Budapest, the Danubius Fountain on Erzsébet Square, has undergone a comprehensive renovation in recent months. Its stones have been cleaned, missing parts replaced, and even worn gilding replaced.

The first Hungarian Olympic Champion, Alfréd Hajós was also the man to design the National Swimming Pool, the temple of Hungarian water sports. Standing on Margit island the structure is not only central to sporting life in the country but remains a masterpiece of 20th-century Hungarian archictecture.

Life today is unimaginable without a phone, yet not so long ago people could wait decades for a connection to be brought to their flat. Those who had landlines could consider themselves privilege, and those selling flats with one could ask a higher price. Thirty years ago, a new telephone exchange in Csepel with 18,000 lines was a huge step forward. Nevertheless, it seemed that it would only be possible to connect half of the flats in the city with phone lines by 2000.

The construction of metro line 3 was a massive undertaking. After 20 years, it is still not fully completed, while its existing sections have been under constant renovation for years. Its last phase was opened 30 years ago, in December 1990.

One hundred and fifty years ago, a gymnasium was built in Budapest, a building that still stands on Szentkirályi Street. However, it is not quite like modern sports halls. From the outside, it looks just another palace. Only a small plaque reminds passers-by that it was once built as the National gymnasium in 1870 following the Austro-Hungarian compromise, during Gyula Andrássy's term as Prime Minister. This is what a gymnasium was like at the time: it looked like a palace and housed not only three halls and dressing rooms, but space for the community to live its life. While the rooms are now used for university education, the sports halls still serve their original function.

Over the last few days, a number of articles have surfaced regarding the two companies that remain in competition to provide the new trains for the suburban railway lines. The new vehicles are much needed, as most of the current trains were bought in the 1970s. The oldest of them has been in use on the Csepel line for 55 years.

St. Stephen's Basilica is the largest church in Budapest. Today, it is one of Budapest's most famous monuments of the capital, thanks to the work of Miklós Ybl. However, it also features prominently in the oeuvre of two other architects: József Hild started its design, while József Kauser finished its construction. Construction lasted an astounding 55 years, and the church was finally consecrated 115 years ago, on 19 November 1905.

The former Szent Gellért Primary School building is being torn down at 8 Gellérhegy Street in the 1st district. A residential building with 44 flats will be built in its place. Demolition began a few days ago.

A real estate development program will be launched in the area around Keleti Railway Station. Government to provide 800 million HUF towards preparations.

The tram stops at Selmeci Street and Szent Margit Hospital have been completely renovated. The passengers of lines 17, 19 and 41 will now enjoy wheelchair access and safe, protected pedestrian crossings to the completely renewed platforms.

The Central bank of Hungary has launched a new series of commemorative coins entitled "The Kings of the Áprád Dynasty that built a nation." A coin issued in honour of Saint Stephen will be the most valuable, with a face value of 500.000 HUF.

The Patrona Hungariae Nursery has been opened following a complete renovation and expansion. The nursery at 65 Szondi Street in the 6th District has been made accessible for those with limited mobility, while new group and development rooms have been created on the newly added upper floor. The internal courtyard was also renovated with new toys and plants.

Officials announced that plans to create a car-free City Park are being prepared. A new overpass will be built above the Rákosrendező railway station to connect Zugló and Angyalföld. A new P+R car park, with 1500 spaces, is to be built at the terminus of the Millennium Underground at Mexikói Road.

The Hungarian state is providing 2,6 Billion HUF of funding, and the Bulgarian state 350 million HUF of support towards the construction of the new Centre of Bulgarian Culture on Vágóhíd Street in Ferencváros. In return for the state aid, the community will renounce its right to use a property on Bajza Street in the 6th District. The new cultural centre will be completed within two or three years.

Archaeologists have found traces of wooden houses from the late Bronze Age, built 3300 years ago, in the 14th district. Wooden remains, ceramic artefacts and a pendant have been unearthed during the excavation.

One of Budapest's oldest and most beautiful butcher shops at 29 Mester Street closed its doors on 31 December.

The former tram terminus at Zugliget is to be renovated as part of the Normafa Park Program, with additional funding provided by the government. A new skating rink will be added to the complex.

CNN has listed the House of Hungarian Music being built in City Park as one of the most anticipated buildings of 2021 globally. The structure will serve as a museum, event venue and educational centre.

A section of the previously closed ruins of what was once the royal stables have been opened to visitors in Buda Castle. The green areas and flowerbeds, and paving of Szent György Square has also been renewed.

A transportation hub of the 3rd District is to be renewed. The neglected buildings are to be removed and the square redesigned to fit its historical setting.

Also known as the White House, the Offices of the Member of the National Assembly are to be renovated. The Office of the National Assembly has issued a public procurement tender for the planning of the renovation of the office building at 19 Széchenyi Embankment.

The former state-owned building of Burg Hotel on Szentháromság Square in the 1st District will be purchased by the Pallas Athéné Domus Meriti Foundation of the Central Bank of Hungary. The hotel closed in 2019, and the building has been vacant ever since.

The reconstruction of the Southern Connecting Wing of the Royal Palace of Buda Castle, including one of its most magnificent rooms, St. Stephen's Hall, is progressing as intended. Ornaments resembling the facade's original decorations are currently being added to the exterior walls. Meanwhile, the beautiful floor coverings of St. Stephen's Hall are also being carved. Plans are to open the building to the public on 20 August 2021.

The suburban railway (HÉV) lines to Csepel, Ráckeve and Szentendre, are to be completely renovated. Trains will be faster, tracks and stations rebuilt, and new, accessible, air-conditioned trains will be purchased. In the first phase of the development, the HÉVs will enter a tunnel at Közvágóhíd ('public slaughterhouse') station and run to Kalvin Square with a stop at Boráros Square. The tracks will disappear from the riverbank allowing for the creation of a cohesive new park promenade.

A tender has been announced for the creation of a statue of Alfred Hajós. The sculpture will be erected on Margit Island, which is connected to Alfred Hajós's intellectual and professional heritage.

A mushroom-shaped fountain with three nozzles, 84 burgundy-red chairs, an exposed concrete retaining wall hundreds of metres long, and water games sunk into the pavement will decorate the renovated Blaha Lujza Square, according to the tender announced by BKK. Prospective contractors can submit their offers for the rebuilding of Budapest's busiest squares 15 February 2021. The works will have to be quick, as according to an agreement between the capital and the government state support for the reconstruction of the square can only be accessed until the end of next year.

The residence of the former leader of the anti-clerical one-party state, János Kádár, is to be used by persecuted Christians. Today, the Prime Minister handed over the villa's keys in the 2nd District to Ignatius Aphrem II, Syrian Orthodox Patriarch.

The tower of the Hungarian National Archives, designed by Samu Pecz and completed in 1918, is to be rebuilt in Buda Castle. The tower was blown up in 1945 to avoid necessary post-war repairs. Furthermore, a new wing will be added to the building, which was not built a hundred years ago due to a lack of funding.

The dining car of the train used by Governor Miklós Horthy, Turán 9, has been returned to Hungary. The dilapidated vehicle will be restored by Hungarian Museum of Science, Technology and Transportation staff.

Bird rattles, curse tablets, glass jars and jewellery have been unearthed during at an excavation in Óbuda, near Bécsi Road, in the cemetery of the Roman-era Military town of Aquincum.

Puskás Arena has one the special prize for most beautiful sports facility at the Prix Versailles Architecture Awards. One of the largest arenas in Central Europe opened in 2019.

The renovation of the 8,200-square-metre roof of Nyugati, or Western Railway Station has reached its second major milestone. The spire of the tower near track 13 has been raised into place. In the meantime, the installation of new planes of glass into the roof and the renovation of its supporting structure are also in progress.

The National Assembly has passed a bill to list Királydomb as a national memorial site. In present-day Kőbánya near the Rákos Stream, the area was the traditional meeting place of the national diets in the Kingdom of Hungary.

Relocation of artefacts and works of art is already underway. The construction of the modern restoration workshops has been completed, and work has begun in the newly established National Restoration and Museum Storage Centre, in which more than three hundred thousand artefacts will be preserved.

Following a recently passed law the building that once housed the National Institute of Psychiatry and Neurology (OPNI) will be renovated, after standing empty for 13 years. The gardens of the property will also be revitalised, the Minister of Finance announced on Saturday.

The renovated and expanded Community Centre for Bulgarians in Hungary has be opened to the public on Vágóhíd Street in the 9th District. The construction of a new Bulgarian educational and cultural centre on the empty plot next to the Bulgarian Orthodox Church of St. Cyril and Methodius on the far side of the street was announced at the ceremony. The centre will stand opposite the Community Centre and be built with 2.6 Billion HUF funding from the Hungarian Government.

The construction of the Budapest Athletics Stadium has begun started in the 9th District. The explosive demolition of Vituki tower block is set to begin the project. The rehabilitation of the former industrial zone and the nearby riverbank will create new open sports and recreation park for the public in the area bordered by Rákóczi Bridge, the Csepel suburban railway line, the northern part of Csepel Island and the Danube.